The speech of a king

The speech of a king

The King’s Speech ( The King’s Speech ), or The King’s Speech in Quebec and New Brunswick , is a drama historic British directed by Tom Hooper , released in 2010 .

Synopsis

In the 1930s , in the United Kingdom , Prince Albert, the second son of King George V , experienced a serious problem of stuttering . The abdication of his elder brother Edward VIII forced him to take the throne under the name of George VI . However, the king must speak in public, despite his disability. At the insistence of his wife , he meets Lionel Logue , Australian orthophonist with unorthodox methods. Despite the reluctance of the prince, Logue’s method works. Albert must overcome his language difficulties to pronounce, in September 1939, the radio speech 1United Kingdom entry into the war against Germany during the Second World War .

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Detailed Summary

Tom Hooper on the set of the film at Queen Street Mill Textile Museum 2 .

Prince Albert, Duke of York and second son of King George V, stutters throughout his closing remarks at the 1925 British Empire Exhibition at Wembley Stadium, while his address is broadcast by radio worldwide . The duke gave up hope of healing, but his wife Elizabeth persuades him to consult Lionel Logue, an Australian speech therapist in London. In their first interview, Logue broke the royal etiquette by calling Prince “Bertie,” a nickname used only by his family. When the Duke considers that neither Logue’s methods nor his manners suit him, Logue bets a shilling that the duke is able to recite easily the Hamlet monologue “To be, or not to be” while listening to The Marriage of Figaroon the helmet. Logue records the recitation on an acetate disc. Persuaded that he stammered all the time, Prince Albert gets angry, declaring his condition “desperate” and he sends Logue back. This one offers him the recording in memory.

After King George V radioed his Christmas speech in 1934, he explained to his son the importance of broadcasting for a modern monarchy. He declares that “David” (Edward, the Prince of Wales), Albert’s eldest brother and heir to the throne, will lead not only himself, but his family and his country, because he will leave continental Europe at the mercy of Nazi Germany and Communist Russia. King George requires Albert to train, starting by reading his father’s speech. He makes a desperate attempt to succeed.

Afterwards, the duke listens to Logue’s recording and hears himself reciting Shakespeare without hesitation. He decides to return to see Logue, but with his wife he insists that Logue is limited to mechanical exercises, without undertaking therapy. Logue teaches his patient muscular relaxation and breath control techniques, but slowly and persistently he continues to probe the psychological roots of stuttering. In the end, the duke reveals some of the pressures he suffered in his childhood, and the two men begin to become friends.

In January 1936, George V died, and David ascended the throne as Edward VIII, but he provoked a constitutional crisis by his determination to marry Wallis Simpson, an American of high society but divorced and still legally married to his second husband. At a party at Balmoral Castle, Albert insists that Edward, as head of the Church of England, can not marry Mrs. Simpson, even if she gets her second divorce. Edward, in response, accuses his brother of seeking revenge for the bullying he had done to her when he was still a child, and at this point he resumes his intimidation, so that Albert responds stammering uncontrollably.

In the next session, Albert expresses his disappointment: if he speaks better when he speaks to most people, he stammers again when he speaks to his own brother, and he reveals all the foolishness of Edward VIII in his relationship with Mrs. Simpson. When Logue maintains that Albert could be a good king instead of his brother, the prince characterizes such a suggestion of treason and, in his anger, makes fun of Logue and sends him away. When King Edward VIII abdicates to marry Mrs. Simpson, Albert succeeds him under the name of George VI. The new king and queen go to see Logue at his house to apologize, much to Mrs.’s surprise. Logue, who did not know that the new king was the patient of her husband.

During the preparations for his coronation at Westminster Abbey, George VI learned that Logue had no official qualifications, contrary to what he had first assured. Logue explains how he was asked to help shocked Australian soldiers returning from the First World War. When George VI remains convinced of his unsuitability for the throne, Logue sits on the seat of King Edward and pulls the Stone of Fate below as a simple trinket. Stung by what seems to be a lack of respect on the part of Logue, the king explodes with anger and is surprised by the eloquence with which he does it.

From the declaration of war on Nazi Germany in September 1939, George VI summoned Logue to Buckingham Palace to prepare the radio address he was to address to millions of listeners in Great Britain and the Empire. Aware of the challenge, Winston Churchill and Prime Minister Neville Chamberlain offer their support. The king and Logue are then left in the studio. The king delivers his speech with a certain mastery under the direction of Logue. At the end of his speech, George VI speaks without difficulty with little or no advice from Logue. Then the king and his family walk on the balcony of the palace, and receive applause from the thousands of people who have gathered.

An excerpt explains that Logue was always present during King George VI’s speeches during the war, and that they remained friends for the rest of their lives.

Technical sheet

  • Original title: The King’s Speech
  • French title: Le Discours d’un roi
  • Quebec title: The King’s Speech
  • Director: Tom Hooper
  • Scenario: David Seidler
  • Artistic direction: Netty Chapman
  • Sets: Freya Wilson  (de)
  • Costumes: Jenny Beavan
  • Photography: Danny Cohen
  • Editing: Tariq Anwar  (en)
  • Music: Alexandre Desplat
  • Additional Music: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart , Ludwig van Beethoven , Johannes Brahms
  • Producer: Iain Canning , Tariq Anwar  (in) and Gareth Unwin
  • Production companies: UK Film Council , See-Saw Films , The Weinstein Company and Bedlam Productions  (en)
  • Distribution Companies: Momentum Pictures  ( United Kingdom) , The Weinstein Company (United States)
  • Budget: £ 10,000,000
  • Country of origin: United Kingdom
  • Original language: English
  • Format: Color – 35mm – 1.85: 1 – Dolby Digital
  • Genre: historical drama
  • Duration: 118 minutes
  • Release dates:
    •  Canada :
    •  United States :
    •  United Kingdom :
    •  France :
    •  Belgium :

Distribution

  • Colin Firth VF : Christian Gonon , VQ : Carl Béchard ) : Albert says “Bertie”, Duke of York and future George VI
  • Geoffrey Rush VF : François Marthouret , VQ : Denis Mercier ) : Lionel Logue
  • Helena Bonham Carter VF : Jeanne Savary ; VQ : Camille Cyr-Desmarais ) : Elizabeth Bowes-Lyon , Duchess of York
  • Guy Pearce VF : Thibault de Montalembert , VQ : Daniel Picard ) : Edward says “David”, Prince of Wales and future Edward VIII
  • Michael Gambon VF : Philippe Laudenbach , VQ : Vincent Davy ) : George V
  • Timothy Spall VF : Hervé Pierre , VQ : Guy Nadon ) : Winston Churchill
  • Jennifer Ehle VQ : Valérie Gagné ) : Myrtle Logue
  • Derek Jacobi VF : Didier Flamand ; VQ : Hubert Fielden ) : Cosmo Lang
  • Anthony Andrews VQ : Jacques Lavallée ) : Stanley Baldwin
  • Roger Hammond VF : Jean-Claude Sachot )Dr. Blandine Bentham
  • Eve Best : Wallis Simpson
  • Claire Bloom VF : Frédérique Cantrel ) : Queen Mary
  • Freya Wilson : Princess Elizabeth , future Queen Elizabeth II .
  • Ramona Marquez : Princess Margaret
  • Roger Parrott VF : George Claisse ) : Neville Chamberlain
  • David Bamber : the theater director
Sources and legend : French version (VF) on Allodoublage 3 and RS Dubbing 4Quebec version (VQ)

Distinctions

Tom Hooper (left) with Colin Firth (right) at the award ceremony of a star with the actor on the Walk of Fame of Hollywood Boulevard , in January 2011.

The film received 118 nominations and won 43 awards.

Awards

  • Satellite Awards 2010 :
    • Best Actor in a Drama (Colin Firth)
    • Best Original Screenplay
  • 2011 Alliance of Women Film Journalists : Best Actor (Colin Firth)
  • Austin Film Critics Association 2011: Best Actor (Colin Firth)
  • British Independent Film Awards 2011:
    • Best independent British film
    • Best Actor (Colin Firth)
    • Best Supporting Actor (Geoffrey Rush)
    • Best Actress in a Supporting Role (Helena Bonham Carter)
    • Best screenplay
    • Richard Harris Award (Helena Bonham Carter)
  • Broadcast Film Critics Association 2011:
    • Best Actor (Colin Firth)
    • Best Original Screenplay
  • Chicago Film Critics Association 2011: Best Actor (Colin Firth)
  • 2011 Detroit Film Critics Society Awards : Best Actor (Colin Firth)
  • Aspen Film Festival 2011: Audience Award
  • 2011 Hollywood Film Festival : Best Actress in a Supporting Role (Helena Bonham Carter)
  • 2011 Hamptons International Film Festival : Audience Award
  • Florida Film Critics Circle Awards 2011: Best Actor (Colin Firth)
  • Golden Globes 2011 : Best Actor in a Drama (Colin Firth)
  • Independent Spirit Awards 2011: best foreign film
  • International Online Film Critics Poll 2011: Best Editing
  • London Film Critics Circle Awards 2011: Best Actor (Colin Firth)
  • Los Angeles Film Critics Association 2011: Best Actor (Colin Firth)
  • New York Film Critics Circle Awards 2011: Best Actor (Colin Firth)
  • Oscars 2011 :
    • Oscar for Best Actor : Colin Firth 5
    • Oscar for Best Original Screenplay : David Seidler
    • Oscar for Best Director : Tom Hooper
    • Oscar for Best Picture : Iain Canning, Emile Sherman and Gareth Unwin, Producers
  • Phoenix Film Critics Society 2011:
    • Best film
    • Best Actor (Colin Firth)
  • European Film Awards 2011: Best European Actor (Colin Firth) 6
  • Goya Awards 2011: Best European Film
  • St. Louis Film Awards Critics Association 2011:
    • Best Actor (Colin Firth)
    • Best screenplay
  • San Francisco Film Critics Circle 2011:
    • Best Actor (Colin Firth)
    • Best Original Screenplay
  • Screen Actors Guild Awards 2011: Best Actor in a Leading Role (Colin Firth)
  • Southeastern Film Critics Association 2011:
    • Best Actor (Colin Firth)
    • Best Supporting Actor (Geoffrey Rush)
    • Best Original Screenplay
  • Washington DC Area Movie Critics Association 2011: Best Actor Colin Firth
  • Women Film Critics Circle 2011: Best Actor (Colin Firth)

Appointments

  • Satellite Awards 2010 :
    • Best Dramatic Film
    • Best Supporting Actor (Geoffrey Rush)
    • Best Director (Tom Hooper)
    • Best costumes
  • Alliance of Women Film Journalists 2011:
    • Best film
    • Best Director (Tom Hooper)
    • Best Supporting Actor (Geoffrey Rush)
    • Best Actress in a Supporting Role (Helena Bonham Carter)
    • Better distribution
    • Best Original Screenplay
  • Austin Film Critics Association 2011: Best Movie
  • British Independent Film Awards 2011:
    • Best Director (Tom Hooper)
    • Best Supporting Actor (Guy Pearce)
    • Best artistic direction
  • Broadcast Film Critics Association 2011:
    • Best film
    • Best Director (Tom Hooper)
    • Best Supporting Actor (Geoffrey Rush)
    • Best Actress in a Supporting Role (Helena Bonham Carter)
    • Better distribution
    • Best photography
    • Best costumes
    • Best music (Alexandre Desplat)
  • Chicago Film Critics Association 2011:
    • Best film
    • Best Director (Tom Hooper)
    • Best Supporting Actor (Geoffrey Rush)
    • Best Actress in a Supporting Role (Helena Bonham Carter)
    • Best screenplay
  • Dallas-Fort Worth Film Critics Association Awards 2010 :
    • Best film
    • Best Director (Tom Hooper)
    • Best Actor (Colin Firth)
    • Best Supporting Actor (Geoffrey Rush)
    • Best Actress in a Supporting Role (Helena Bonham Carter)
  • Detroit Film Critics Society Awards 2011:
    • Best film
    • Best Director (Tom Hooper)
    • Best Supporting Actor (Geoffrey Rush)
    • Best Actress in a Supporting Role (Helena Bonham Carter)
    • Better distribution
  • Golden Globes 2011 :
    • Best Drama – Drama
    • Best Director : Tom Hooper
    • Best Supporting Actor : Geoffrey Rush
    • Best Supporting Actress : Helena Bonham Carter
    • Best Screenplay : David Seidler
    • Best Movie Music : Alexandre Desplat
  • Houston Film Critics Society 2011:
    • Best film
    • Best Actor (Colin Firth)
    • Best Supporting Actor (Geoffrey Rush)
    • Best Actress in a Supporting Role (Helena Bonham Carter)
  • Las Vegas Film Critics Society 2011:
    • Best film
    • Best Director (Tom Hooper)
    • Best Actor (Colin Firth)
    • Best Supporting Actor (Geoffrey Rush)
    • Best artistic direction
    • Best costumes
  • London Film Critics Circle Awards 2011:
    • Best film
    • Best screenplay
    • Best British film
    • Best British director (Tom Hooper)
    • Best British Actor (Colin Firth)
    • Best British actress (Helena Bonham Carter)
  • Los Angeles Film Critics Association 2011:
    • Best Supporting Actor (Geoffrey Rush)
    • Best artistic direction
  • Oscars 2011 :
    • Best Supporting Actor : Geoffrey Rush
    • Best Supporting Actress : Helena Bonham Carter
    • Best Artistic Director : Eve Stewart, Judy Farr
    • Best Photography : Danny Cohen
    • Best costumes : Jenny Beavan
    • Best Editing : Tariq Anwar
    • Best Movie Music : Alexandre Desplat
    • Best sound mix : Paul Hamblin, Martin Jensen, John Midgley
  • Phoenix Film Critics Society 2011:
    • Best Director (Tom Hooper)
    • Best Supporting Actor (Geoffrey Rush)
    • Best Actress in a Supporting Role (Helena Bonham Carter)
    • Better distribution
    • Best artistic direction
    • Best costumes
  • St. Louis Film Awards Critics Association 2011:
    • Best film
    • Best Director (Tom Hooper)
    • Best Supporting Actor (Geoffrey Rush)
    • Best Actress in a Supporting Role (Helena Bonham Carter)
    • Best artistic direction
  • San Diego Film Critics Society 2011:
    • Best film
    • Best Actor (Colin Firth)
    • Best Supporting Actor (Geoffrey Rush)
    • Best screenplay
  • Screen Actors Guild Awards 2011:
    • Best Supporting Actor (Geoffrey Rush)
    • Best Actress in a Supporting Role (Helena Bonham Carter)
    • Better distribution
  • Southeastern Film Critics Association 2011: Best Movie
  • Toronto Film Critics Association 2011: Best Actor (Colin Firth)
  • Utah Film Critics Association 2011:
    • Best Actor (Colin Firth)
    • Best Supporting Actor (Geoffrey Rush)
  • Washington DC Area Movie Critics Association 2011:
    • Best Supporting Actor (Geoffrey Rush)
    • Best Actress in a Supporting Role (Helena Bonham Carter)
    • Best Original Screenplay

Around the film

The discovery in 2009 of Lionel Logue’s journals in the granary of Mark, the grandson of the speech therapist, suggests, contrary to the film, that the therapy did not use swear words and that the friendship between the two men did not did not go as far as familiarity, Logue respectfully naming the King “Your Majesty” and not “Bertie” 7 .

On the other hand, the therapy began in October 1926, well before the death of George V, and continued until the 1940s.

The actors Colin Firth (George VI) and Jennifer Ehle (Myrtle Logue) have already played together in the mini-series Pride and Prejudice (1995), respectively in the roles of Fitzwilliam Darcy and Elizabeth Bennet . On the other hand, Colin Firth had already played with Geoffrey Rush in the movie Shakespeare in Love (1998), the two actors holding only secondary roles.

The film gives pride of place to the legend “glamor” of the abdication of Edward VIII for love of a divorcee, but, as noted by France Inter , “if the King of England, Edward VIII abdicated in 1936, it was not only for the beautiful eyes of Wallis Simpson, a twice divorced American, that he wanted to marry, but because the British government wanted to dismiss a monarch who had too much sympathy for Nazi Germany and its rulers. ” (France Inter,” appointment with X ” 8 ) in the archives of the FBI 9 .

Bibliography

  • Mark Logue, Peter Conradi 10 , The Speech of a King: The History of the Man Who Saved the British Monarchy , Plon, ( ISBN  978-2259214926 ).

External links

On other Wikimedia projects:

  • The King’s Speech , on Wikimedia Commons
  • (In) Official website  [ archive ]
  • (en) The King’s Speech [ archive ] on the Internet Movie Database
  • The Speech of a King [ archive ] on Allociné

Notes and references

  1. ↑ (in) original Speech of George VI 3 September 1939 ”  [ archive ] , on BBC , BBC News (accessed December 23, 2011 )
  2. ↑ (in) Queen Street Mill Textile Museum ”  [ archive ] on Lancashire Museums
  3. ↑ Allodouble [ archive ]
  4. ↑ RS Dubbing [ archive ]
  5. ↑ (in) Oscars: Colin Firth gets a well-deserved win for The King’s Speech ”  [ archive ] , on Los Angeles Times (accessed 12 March 2011 )
  6. ↑ (in) The 24th European Film Awards: Winners ”  [ archive ] , on europeanfilmacademy.org (accessed on 9 December 2011 )
  7. ↑ Peter Conradi  (in) , ” The true story of the man who saved the king’s voice ”  [ archive ] , on Lefigaro.fr ,
  8. ↑ ” France Inter,” Rendez-vous with X “ ”  [ archive ] , on France Inter , France Inter, (accessed July 8, 2017 )
  9. ↑ ” The World Culture,” Edward VIII, agent of the Nazis? ”  ”  [ Archive ] , on World Culture , the World, (accessed July 8, 2017 )
  10. ↑ Mark Logue is one of the grand-son of Lionel Logue and Peter Conradi journalist for the Sunday Times .

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